Tag: exercise

Shin Splints: Prevention and Battle

Shin SplintsIf you’re new to exercise, and decided running would be a great way to get fit, you may have run into a few roadblocks here and there. Hopefully, shin splints weren’t one of them. In case they were, here is a way to rule out if your footwear caused them, and keep them from coming back!

Are You at Risk of Developing Shin Splints?

Check your feet and footwear. Do your shoes look overly worn on one side versus the other? And do you have flat, natural, or high arches? If you have flat feet, you should be wearing shoes that provide some medial posting for stability. Take a look at your shoes, and see if there is a small piece of plastic or harder material on the medial side of the shoes. If there isn’t, the chance exists you’re running in shoes that provide too much cushion, and not enough support for your arches. Every time your feet strike the ground, your arches fall unsupported; and, cause the various muscles involved to work less efficiently. Eventually, this leads to pain and injury.

The Benefits of Compression Clothing

Compression ClothingA few years ago there was an enormous surge behind wearing compression clothing in the endurance and multisport communities. Compression clothing’s immense popularity eventually bled into other fitness niches, whether for function or fashion, as often seen with Crossfit, Football, Soccer, Swimming, and other Fitness Enthusiasts. Even as a techno-savvy triathlete, the compression clothing was something I always wondered about, and after some research, even utilized. A big question has always been whether the compression clothing provides form over function, or vice-versa. If you ever watch a triathlon, you’ll wonder whether the extent that some  endurance athletes wear this is even necessary or effective. Sure, I have a pair of socks that I wear after long training sessions, or tough races, but does it really work? Some great research was published, and the answer is “yes.”

Travel and Exercise

Travel and ExerciseSummer is in full swing, and by now you’ve probably started wondering how to keep off the weight!  With summer time comes travel, vacation, eating out, and alot of inactivity thanks to the oppressive heat. All form a great combination for weight gain if you’re not mindful!

Travel and exercise can mix rather seamlessly though! If you’re traveling, set aside time to do something that raises your heart rate. Use your hotel’s fitness center if available, or choose to take the steps instead of an elevator. If on vacation, plan something activities that are fun in addition to why you’re going. For instance, go on an excursion that requires some hiking, or rent bicycles and ride them along the beach. When you eat out, keep it light, make healthy choices, and mind your alcohol intake.

Avoid Heat Illness: Stay Cool During Exercise

heat-illness-exercise-waterHere in Arizona it gets HOT; But, just because it gets dangerously hot, doesn’t mean people here lie inactive around the house during the summer months. In the midst of summer, it’s already 85F by 7AM, and by 10AM, temps are touching the 100s. To exercise in this 4 month oven, Arizonans make habit of a few simple, and easily adaptable practices. We can ALL learn something from how they deal with the heat.  Here are five tips for dealing with the heat, and avoiding heat illness regardless of where you live.

Alcohol’s Effects on Exercise and Performance

Drink BeerAlcohol: What is it?

Ethyl alcohol, also known as ethanol, is found in beer, wine, and liquor. It is produced through the fermentation of yeast, sugars, and starches. Humans have consumed alcohol for many thousands of years, both intentionally and unintentionally.

Alcohol is a depressant that affects the human body in several different ways, and can have dire consequences if abused. It affects metabolism, neural function, cardiovascular physiology, thermoregulation, and skeletal muscle (1). Physiology, behavior, and impairment are progressively affected by a person’s blood alcohol content (BAC). This is the amount of alcohol that is circulating through the bloodstream. Impairment becomes progressively worse as BAC rises. This impairment includes the ability to concentrate and reason; it also affects vision, reflexes, speech, memory, motor skills, and organ function.